Thought Leadership

California - COVID-19 Community Resource Guide

Client Updates

To help address the concerns of individuals in our communities affected by COVID-19, Baker Botts has published an extensive COVID-19 Community Resource Guide.

The page below pertains specifically to California. To see all of the jurisdictions covered, please click here

This guide provides general information only that may or may not be applicable in individual circumstances.  It is not intended as legal advice. For legal advice in specific circumstances, please consult your own lawyer. This material may constitute attorney advertising in some jurisdictions.

Topics include: 

 

CALWORKS AND CALFRESH

What is CalWORKs (CALIFORNIA WORK OPPORTUNITY AND RESPONSIBILITY TO KIDS?)

CalWORKs is a public assistance program that provides cash aid and other support services to families with children and caretaker relatives of foster children.

Eligible households receive monthly cash aid for necessary expenses.

What benefits are available?

Monthly cash payments to help pay for housing, food, utilities, clothing, medical care, and other necessary expenses.

How much cash can I get per month through CalWORKS?

The amount of cash you may be eligible for depends on your level of need. The chart below shows the maximum amount of aid payments:

 

CalWORKs Maximum Grant Amounts

 

Region 1

Region 2

Family Size

Exempt

Non-Exempt

Exempt

Non-Exempt

1

$606

$550

$576

$520

2

$778

$696

$739

$661

3

$983

$878

$934

$834

4

$1,181

$1,060

$1,122

$1,007

5

$1,385

$1,242

$1,316

$1,180

6

$1,589

$1,424

$1,510

$1,353

7

$1,792

$1,606

$1,702

$1,526

8

$1,998

$1,788

$1,898

$1,699

9

$2,199

$1,970

$2,089

$1,872

10

$2,406

$2,152

$2,286

$2,044


For a complete description of maximum aid payments and examples, visit https://ca.db101.org/ca/programs/income_support/calworks/program2b.htm.

Do I qualify?

To qualify for CalWORKs, you must be:

  • A resident of the state of California;
  • A U.S. national, citizen, legal noncitizen, or permanent resident;
  • Have low or very low income;Be either under-employed (working for very low wages), unemployed, or about to become unemployed; and

Be one of the following:

  • Pregnant;
  • Have a child 18 and under; or
  •  Be 18 and under and the head of your household.

The chart below shows the maximum monthly income to qualify for CalWORKs benefits:

 

Minimum Basic Standard of Adequate Care (MBSAC) Levels

Family Size

Region 1

Region 2

1

$714

$678

2

$1,172

$1,114

3

$1,453

$1,379

4

$1,724

$1,639

5

$1,967

$1,874

6

$2,213

$2,105

7

$2,432

$2,307

8

$2,646

$2,519

9

$2,871

$2,722

10

$3,116

$2,964

More than 10

Add $28 for each extra person

Add $28 for each extra person

For a complete description of income limits and examples, visit https://ca.db101.org/ca/programs/income_support/calworks/program2.htm.

To determine eligibility, visit https://www.benefits.gov/benefit/1229#Eligibility_Checker.

Where do I apply for CalWORKS benefits?

You can apply online at http://www.benefitscal.org/ or by contacting your county human services agency. A list of county agencies can be found online at https://www.cdss.ca.gov/county-offices.

What information will I need when applying?

Be ready to answer questions about everyone applying, such as:

  • Proof of income and property;
  • Citizenship status;
  • Age;
  • Social Security Number;
  • Residence;
  • Shelter Costs; and
  • Work or school status.

Adult family members will also be fingerprinted and photo imaged.

Are there rules if I receive CalWORKS benefits?

Yes. Parents or caretakers receiving CalWORKs benefits must follow certain requirements to maintain CalWORKs assistance, including:

  • Income requirements;
  • Resource requirements (i.e., other assets);
  • Adherence to the Welfare-to-Work program (unless exempt);
  • School attendance for children; and
  •  Immunizations for children.

For answers to frequently asked questions, visit https://ca.db101.org/ca/programs/income_support/calworks/faqs.htm.

For general information about CalWORKS, see: https://www.cdss.ca.gov/calworks; and https://www.cdss.ca.gov/inforesources/calworks.

back to top

 

CALFRESH

What is CalFresh?

The CalFresh program provides monthly food benefits to individuals and families with low income.

How does it work?

CalFresh benefits are loaded onto a Golden State Advantage card that can be used at any grocery store or farmers market that accepts electronic benefit transfer (“EBT”) cards.

Do I qualify?

To qualify for CalFresh benefits, you must follow the work rules (listed below) and have monthly income lower than the following amounts:

 

Income Guidelines

October 1, 2019 – September 30, 2020

Household Size

Gross Monthly Income

1

$2,082

2

$2,820

3

$3,556

4

$4,292

5

$5,030

6

$5,766

7

$6,502

8

$7,240

*Add this amount for each additional member

+ $738

Source: http://mycalfresh.org/the-basics/.

What are the work rules that I have to follow if I receive CalFresh benefits?

Everyone who gets CalFresh benefits must register for work or apply for work every 12 months, unless exempt.

Unless exempt from work registration, CalFresh recipients cannot, without good cause, voluntarily quit a job.

For more information, visit http://calfresh.guide/work-rules-and-requirements/.

How much can I receive in CalFresh benefits?

Eligible recipients of CalFresh benefits receive up to the following maximum amounts:

 

People in Household

Maximum Monthly Allotment

1

$194

2

$355

3

$509

4

$646

5

$768

6

$921

7

$1,108

Sourcehttps://www.sandiegocounty.gov/hhsa/programs/ssp/food_stamps/benefit_amount.html.

Can I use CalFresh benefits to buy anything?

No. CalFresh benefits cannot be used to buy:

  • Alcohol, tobacco, cigarettes;
  • Non-food items (e.g., pet food, toilet paper, diapers, soap, etc.);
  • Vitamins and medicine;
  • Foods that will be eaten in the store; or
  •  Hot foods (unless your county participates in the Restaurant Meals Program).

For answers to frequently asked questions, visit http://mycalfresh.org/calfresh-faqs/using-calfresh/.

Where do I apply for CalFresh benefits?

Apply online at https://www.getcalfresh.org/, over the phone by dialing (877) 847-3663, or by contacting your county office at https://calfresh.dss.ca.gov/food/officelocator.

I’m already a recipient of CalFresh benefits. Do I need to renew?

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, your CalFresh benefits will continue with no changes for March 2020 through June 2020.  If your semiannual report or annual renewal was due in either March, April, or May 2020, you do not have to turn in the report or complete the interview. More information is available at https://www.sfhsa.org/services/health-food/calfresh.

Additionally, each CalFresh recipient will receive an emergency allotment that will be automatically added to your EBT card. For more information regarding the emergency allotment, see: 
https://wclp.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/CalFreshEmergencyAllotmentFinalFactsheet_4.3.2020.pdf.

I’m not eligible for CalFresh. What food assistance resources do I have?

The State of California has the California Food Assistance Program (“CFAP”), which provides state-funded food stamps for qualified noncitizens who do not qualify for federal benefits. For more information, visit https://www.cdss.ca.gov/inforesources/calfresh/california-food-assistance-program.

For general information about CalFresh, check the following resources:

back to top

 

HOMELESSNESS AND INDIVIDUALS IN COMMUNITY/SUPPORTIVE HOUSING

CALIFORNIA – GENERALLY

What is California doing to provide assistance to persons experiencing homelessness?

The State of California is providing $150 million for local emergency homelessness actions, with $100 million being deployed directly to local governments for shelter support and emergency housing and $50 million allocated for the purchase or lease of facilities in partnership with counties and cities to provide immediate isolation placements.

The State of California also is immediately procuring 1,309 travel trailers from Federal Emergency Management (“FEMA”) and private vendors to provide quarantine capacity for persons in shelters who either have COVID-19 or are experiencing symptoms.

“Project Roomkey” seeks to secure up to 15,000 hotel and motel rooms to use as isolation rooms for persons experiencing homelessness. Each room within “Project Roomkey” will include essential wraparound services, such as custodial, laundry, security and support staff.

For additional information, visit:

My jurisdiction has received funds for providing assistance to persons experiencing homelessness. Are there any restrictions at the state level for spending these funds?

Governor Gavin Newsom signed Executive Order N-32-20 which eases certain state law restrictions on spending Homeless Emergency Aid Program funds, Homeless Housing, Assistance, and Prevention Program funds, and funds appropriated in Senate Bill 89, signed on March 17, 2020. The Order provides for limited suspension of the following state codes to the extent that they restrict or impact a jurisdiction’s ability to spend funds to address the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic:

  • Health & Safety Code Section 50214, subdivision (a);
  • Health & Safety Code Section 50219, subdivision (c); and
  • Division 13 of the Public Resources Code (starting with section 21000).

For more information, see:

I provide assistance to persons experiencing homelessness. What resources are available to ensure the safety of the individuals I support?

The Business, Consumer Services and Housing Agency (the “Agency”) issued interim guidance on March 18, 2020 that provides safety guidance and contact information. The guidance can be found at https://www.bcsh.ca.gov/hcfc/documents/covid19_homeless_guide.pdf.

As the situation develops, the Agency is providing updates and links to guidance from the CDC and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (“HUD”) at https://www.bcsh.ca.gov/hcfc/coronavirus19/index.html.

CALIFORNIA - SAN FRANCISCO 

What is San Francisco doing to help persons experiencing homelessness?

San Francisco has created a $5 million emergency fund and a new Public Health Order focused on reducing the risk of exposure to the virus for the many marginally-housed seniors, people with underlying health conditions, and individuals experiencing homelessness, living in shelters, single-room occupancy hotels, and Permanent Supportive Housing. 

The programs include, but are not limited to, expanded cleaning services for shelters, resource centers and single-room occupancy hotels, increased meal service and delivery, and outreach programs.  Outreach teams are providing information, hand sanitizer, and recommendations for staying healthy.  The City also has deployed additional handwashing stations available to all persons.

More information is available at https://sfmayor.org/article/san-francisco-increases-covid-19-protections-homeless-residents-and-people-living-single.

San Francisco’s Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing developed a map showing public bathroom and handwashing facilities that have been deployed by the city. The map is available at https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1jCE9lI8Iv12tO-wWrF6RIQPWKXGBK0_z&ll=37.77496798800447%2C-122.45194099008506&z=12.

On March 27, 2020, Mayor London Breed announced the plan to open a new shelter at Moscone Center West: https://sfmayor.org/article/san-francisco-open-new-shelter-moscone-center-response-covid-19-and-need-more-social.

I own or operate a single-room occupancy facility. Are there any guidelines that I need to follow?

Yes. On March 10, 2020, San Francisco’s Department of Public Health issued Order No. C19-04 requiring owners and operators of SRO facilities to follow certain minimum cleaning standards.

Order No. C19-04 is available at https://www.sfdph.org/dph/alerts/files/OrderC19-04-signed.pdf; and

The standards are available at:  https://www.sfdph.org/dph/alerts/files/COVID%E2%80%9019-Minimum-Environmental-Cleaning-Standards.pdf.

Can I go visit someone who lives in one of the city’s residential facilities?

San Francisco’s Department of Public Health issued Order No. C19-09 on March 18, 2020 which restricts visitors and non-essential personnel, as defined in the Order, from visiting certain residential facilities. For a list of impacted facilities, see Section 20 of the order at https://www.sfdph.org/dph/alerts/files/Order-C19-09-ExcludingVisitorstoARFs-RCFEs-03192020.pdf.

I want to donate or volunteer help. Who should I contact?

You can find a list of nonprofit groups focused on assisting persons experiencing homelessness online at https://projects.sfchronicle.com/sf-homeless/how-to-help/.

What are the other San Francisco Bay Area counties doing to help persons experiencing homelessness?

For county-specific resources, please see the following:

back to top

 

EVICTIONS

Homeowners: Mortgage/Foreclosure

What do I do if I've lost my income because of the COVID-19 crisis and cannot pay my mortgage?

If you have had a loss or substantial reduction of income because of the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, contact your mortgage servicer (the company you pay each month). Depending on the type of your mortgage, your servicer may be able to offer you a delayed payment plan to help reduce the impact of the crisis.

Under the recently-enacted CARES Act, the U.S. Government has required servicers of federally backed mortgage loans to offer deferral of monthly payments for up to 180 days for people who suffered a financial hardship as a result of COVID-19. CARES Act § 4022(b)(2). This term may be extended another 180 days if the loss persists. The CARES Act text may be found at: https://www.congress.gov/116/bills/hr748/BILLS-116hr748enr.xml.

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have also announced payment forbearances of up to 12 months due to hardships caused by the COVID-19 crisis. Fannie Mae’s announcement is available at https://www.fanniemae.com/portal/media/corporate-news/2020/covid-homeowner-assistance-options-7000.html. Freddie Mac’s announcement is available at http://www.freddiemac.com/about/covid-19.html.

States, including California, have also announced programs to provide relief for homeowners. On March 25, 2020, Governor Newsom announced a program encouraging private mortgage servicers to allow for a grace period of up to 90 days on mortgage payments with minimal impact on your credit rating. The announcement is available at https://www.gov.ca.gov/2020/03/25/governor-gavin-newsom-announces-major-financial-relief-package-90-day-mortgage-payment-relief-during-covid-19-crisis/. While this program is voluntary, many large institutions have said they will participate: https://dbo.ca.gov/covid19-updates-fi/.

What is a federally backed mortgage loan?

A loan owned, insured, or guaranteed by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Agriculture, Fannie Mae, or Freddie Mac. CARE Act § 4022(a)(2). For more information, see: https://www.nhlp.org/wp-content/uploads/foreclosure-protection-CARES-Act.pdf.

Can my home still face foreclosure, or can I still be evicted?

Under the CARES Act, servicers of federally backed mortgages cannot “initiate any judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process, move for a foreclosure judgment or order of sale, or execute a foreclosure-related eviction or foreclosure sale” until at least May 17, 2020. CARES Act § 4022(c)(2).

Under the California program, many financial institutions have committed to not starting any new foreclosure sales or evictions for at least 60 days (until May 24, 2020). For more information, see https://covid19.ca.gov/get-financial-help/

What qualifies as financial hardship caused by the COVID-19 pandemic?

There is no strict rubric, but speaking generally, events such as: job loss, reduction in hours or income, increased costs associated with caring for family members, increased medical costs, and other costs that are attributable to COVID-19 and the response to COVID-19. In an Executive Order, Governor Newsom set out other examples. This order can be found at: https://www.gov.ca.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/3.27.20-EO-N-37-20.pdf. 

What kind of documentation do I need?

This will vary depending on your mortgage servicer who will explain what they require. In some cases, financial institutions may accept a declaration that you are unable to make a monthly payment because of impacts of the COVID-19 crisis. For mortgages eligible for forbearance under the CARES Act, you are only required to affirm that you are experiencing a financial hardship during the COVID-19 emergency. CARES Act §§ 4022(b)(1)(B), 4022(c)(1).

You should keep documents that demonstrate: (a) the extent of the hardship; and (b) that the hardship is a result of the pandemic. Examples include: letter from employer stating that your reduction or loss of income is related to COVID-19; doctor's note including a COVID-19 diagnosis for you or a family member for whom you are caring; medical bills; and bank statements.

How long will these programs be available?

Forbearance for mortgage payments for federally backed mortgage loans for persons who’ve suffered losses due to the COVID-19 crisis is to be available until the earlier of the end of the COVID-19 emergency or December 31, 2020. CARES Act § 4023(f)(5); § 4022(b)(1).

Because the situation with COVID-19 is constantly updating, the exact bounds of the program endorsed by Governor Newsom are uncertain. Participating financial institutions have committed to providing necessary relief. Keep yourself aware of up-to-date information from your mortgage service and the State of California by visiting https://covid19.ca.gov/get-financial-help/#top

What else do I need to know about requesting temporary relief from my mortgage because of COVID-19?

None of the national or state-level programs are automatic. You must be proactive in requesting forbearance.

Start the process early by contacting your mortgage servicer if you know or expect that you will have trouble paying your mortgage due to losses caused by COVID-19. Most financial institutions are very busy with requests and there may be delays. Where possible, use email or a trackable online interface so that you can maintain a record of the communication.

Remember that deferred payments are not forgiven or waived. At the end of the forbearance you will be required to work with your servicer to make your payments current.

Other resources:

back to top 

 

Renters: Missed Rent / Eviction

What do I do if I've lost my income because of the COVID-19 crisis and cannot pay my rent?

Contact your landlord and explain your situation. You may be able to agree on a plan for delayed payments or reduced monthly rent payments.

Contact your landlord early—before you miss a rent payment. This added time provides extra flexibility for everyone involved.

There are many emergency rental assistance programs that may be available depending on where you live. Consult your local government websites for more information. Note that many of these programs have restrictions based on need.

If I can’t pay rent because of the COVID-19 crisis, can I still be evicted?

At this time, there is no general nationwide or statewide freeze on evictions.

On March 27, 2020, Governor Newsom issued an executive order that halted eviction proceedings for tenants who satisfy certain conditions through at least May 31, 2020. The order is available at https://www.gov.ca.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/3.27.20-EO-N-37-20.pdf (referred to as the “March 27 Order”).

Cities and counties across the State are taking additional steps to protect renters from being evicted for non-payment of rent due to losses caused by COVID-19. See the section below labeled “Example City and County Actions.”

Even if you are prevented from being evicted, you will still be required to pay back rent in a timely manner.  

What conditions do I have to satisfy to be protected under the statewide order?

You must have had a prior lease agreement with your landlord. March 27 Order § (1)(a).

You must notify your landlord in writing before, or within 7 days of, a missed payment, that you will be unable to pay the full amount due to reasons related to COVID-19. March 27 Order § (1)(b).

You must maintain verifiable documentation of your losses that must be presented no later than upon payment of back-due rent. March 27 Order § (1)(c).

What qualifies as a loss caused by the COVID-19 pandemic?

Governor Newsom’s order lists the “reasons related to COVID-19” as including: you were unable to work because you were sick with a confirmed or suspected case of COVID-19 or because you were caring for someone in your household or family with a confirmed or suspected case of COVID-19; you had an income reduction such as loss of a job or hours because of COVID-19 or a related government response; or you had to miss work to care for a child whose school was closed in response to COVID-19. March 27 Order § (1)(b)(i)–(iii).

Generally, events such as job loss, reduction in hours or income, increased childcare costs and costs associated with caring for other family members, increased medical costs, and other similar costs that are clearly attributable to COVID-19 and the response to COVID-19, are applicable for city or county protections. For example, see https://www.mv-voice.com/news/reports/1585085000.pdf (Santa Clara County’s Eviction Moratorium, Sec. 3(c)(1)–(2).

What kind of documentation do I need?

This may vary depending on where you live and possibly your landlord. You should keep documents that demonstrate: (a) the extent of the hardship; and (b) that the hardship is a result of the pandemic. Examples provided by the March 27 Order § (1)(c) and the Los Angeles Eviction Moratorium (see https://hcidla.lacity.org/covid-19-eviction-moratorium) include:

  • Termination notices from your employer;
  • Payroll checks;
  • Pay stubs;
  • Bank statements;
  • Medical bills;
  • Signed letters from your employer or supervisor explaining the changed financial circumstances; and
  • Signed doctor's note including a COVID-19 diagnosis for you or a family member for whom you are caring. 

How do I know if I live in an area covered by other COVID-19 loss-related eviction moratoriums?

Check the websites of your county and city for the latest information. Local news is also a good source. As with many things relating to COVID-19, the situation is still actively developing. Questions that you should ask include:

  • Has a local authority (city council, mayor, etc.) issued an emergency order or ordinance prevents COVID-19-related evictions?
  • How long is an eviction moratorium scheduled to last?
  • What particular documentation is required to qualify for protection?
  • What procedure do you have to follow to quality?
  • How soon will you be required to pay back rent?

Example city and county actions

Following are a few example orders from just the last two weeks:

  • Santa Clara County: On March 24, 2020, the County of Santa Clara has banned evictions through May 31, 2020 for any tenant who can demonstrate that the eviction is for failure to pay rent and that the failure is a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Result includes loss of income or out-of-pocket medical expenses. Also created a 120-day grace period for payment of back rent without late fee. For more information, visit https://www.mv-voice.com/news/reports/1585085000.pdf.
  • San Mateo County: On March 24, 2020, the County of San Mateo banned evictions through May 31, 2020 for any tenant who can demonstrate that the eviction is for failure to pay rent and that the failure is a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Result includes loss of income or out-of-pocket medical expenses. Created a 180-day grace period for payment of back rent without a late fee. For more information, visit https://www.smdailyjournal.com/news/local/san-mateo-county-banning-evictions/article_341ac67c-6e4b-11ea-96da-bfb70d139e5c.html.
  • City of Los Angeles: On March 15, 2020, Mayor Garcetti issued an Emergency Order creating a moratorium on evictions for non-payment of rent for tenants who are unable to pay rent due to the COVID-19 crisis. Qualifying circumstances include lost income, increased childcare and healthcare costs, or expenditures stemming from government emergency measures. The order applies to certain eviction actions filed on or after March 4, 2020. The order lasts until June 20, 2020, unless extended. Tenants will have up to 6 months following the expiration of the state of emergency declared for the City of Los Angeles to pay back rent. For more information, visit https://hcidla.lacity.org/covid-19-eviction-moratorium.
  • City of San Francisco: On March 23, 2020, Mayor Breed ordered that no landlord may attempt to evict a residential unit unless due to violence or health and safety issues. The moratorium is set to last until June 21, 2020, unless extended. For more information, visit https://sf.gov/news/about-citys-temporary-moratorium-evictions.

back to top

 

UTILITY ASSISTANCE

CALIFORNIA – GENERALLY

Many utilities providers throughout California are suspending shutoffs for nonpayment and offering flexible payment plans or assistance programs during the COVID-19 crisis. 

For more information, you can visit your specific utility’s website.  For a list of resources and utility websites, visit https://www.cpuc.ca.gov/covid19protections/. 

CALIFORNIA – SAN FRANCISCO

Will my utility services be disconnected if I am unable to pay?

PG&E, which provides gas and electricity for most San Francisco residential addresses, has also suspended shutoffs for nonpayment for all residential and small business customers.  For more information, visit https://www.pge.com/en_US/about-pge/company-information/protective-protocols/covid19-protections.page.

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, which provides water service in San Francisco, has suspended shutoffs for nonpayment and will not add penalties for delinquent payments.  The press release is available at  https://sfmayor.org/article/san-francisco-suspend-power-and-water-shutoffs-waive-penalties-and-interest-delinquent.

Can I get help paying my utilities?

PG&E, which provides gas and electricity for most San Francisco residential addresses, is offering flexible payment plans during the COVID-19 crisis.  It also has discount programs to help eligible customers pay their energy bills:

California Alternate Rates for Energy Program (“CARE”): Eligible customers can receive a monthly discount of 20% or more on gas and electricity. 

Family Electric Rate Assistance Program (“FERA”): Eligible households with three or more people can receive a monthly discount of 18% on electricity only.

Relief for Energy Assistance through Community Help (“REACH”): Eligible customers impacted by COVID-19 will be provided with up to an additional $100 in bill payment assistance through March 4, 2021.  This program provides additional financial assistance during times of hardship, and participants qualify based on income. 

For questions or assistance about these programs, you can contact PG&E by email at [email protected] or by phone at (866) 743-2273.

You can also contact the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission about entering into a payment plan by email at [email protected] or by phone at (415) 551-3000.

How do I make my utility payments?

PG&E’s walk-in payment and customer service centers are temporarily closed.  You can make payments in the following ways:

  • Calling (877) 704-8470;
  • Paying online at www.pge.com; or
  • Mailing payments to PG&E, P.O. Box 997300, Sacramento, CA 95899.

Visit https://www.pge.com/en_US/residential/your-account/your-bill/ways-to-pay/ways-to-pay.page for more information.

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission’s walk-in payment and customer service centers are also temporarily closed.  You can make payments in the following ways:

  • Paying online through your account at https://myaccount.sfwater.org/ or making a one-time payment at https://secure8.i-doxs.net/ezpay/Welcome.aspx?billerid=vx3xRjZq87;
  • Calling (415) 551-3000 and following the recorded instructions to “pay by phone” or calling (844) 737-8222 for an automated payment service provider;
  • Mailing payment by sending the bottom portion of the bill with a check or money order payable to San Francisco Water to P.O. Box 7369, San Francisco, CA 94120-7369 (do not mail cash); or
  • Paying with cash at participating 7-Eleven stores with an EZ-Pay barcode, downloadable at www.sfwater.org/waterezpay.

Who do I contact if i have a problem with my utility services?

PG&E: For residential customers, contact the customer service number at (877) 660-6789.  For business customers, contact the business customer service center at (800) 468-4743.  Visit https://www.pge.com/en_US/about-pge/company-information/protective-protocols/covid19.page for more information about PG&E’s response to COVID-19. 

San Francisco Public Utilities Commission: Customers can contact the customer service number at (415) 551-3000 or by email at [email protected].  Visit https://sfwater.org/index.aspx?page=1321 for more information about the Public Utilities Commission’s response to COVID-19. 

back to top

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

GENERAL

The New York Times is maintaining and updating a list of stay-at-home orders: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/us/coronavirus-stay-at-home-order.html.

Stranded U.S. citizens in need of emergency assistance should contact the local embassy or consulate or the Overseas Citizens Service ((202) 501-4444). Please be aware of any updated embassy information: https://www.state.gov/coronavirus/.

If you’re currently abroad, consider enrolling in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program: https://step.state.gov/step/

Travelers should be aware of current restrictions and requirements issued by the CDC and DHS: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/from-other-countries.html; see also https://www.dhs.gov/publication/notices-arrival-restrictions-coronavirus.

 

MENTAL HEALTH & WELLNESS

back to top 

 

STATE RESOURCES

All states

Taxes:  The Tax Foundation is tracking state legislative responses to COVID-19, including extensions of deadlines to file state tax returns and pay taxes: https://taxfoundation.org/state-tax-coronavirus-covid19/#timeline.

California – Statewide

Assistance for the Homeless

The California Health & Human Services Agency has issued public health guidance to homeless service providers: https://www.bcsh.ca.gov/hcfc/documents/covid19_homeless_guide.pdf.

Courts

Executive Orders

Financial Help

The State of California issued a resource providing information on how to seek financial help during the COVID-19 crisis: https://covid19.ca.gov/get-financial-help/#top.

California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (“CalWORKs”) provides aid to eligible households: https://www.cdss.ca.gov/calworks; and https://www.cdss.ca.gov/inforesources/calworks.

CalFresh provides monthly food benefits to eligible individuals and families: https://www.cdss.ca.gov/food-nutrition/calfresh; and http://mycalfresh.org/.

California Food Assistance Program (“CFAP”) provides state-funded food stamps for qualified noncitizens: https://www.cdss.ca.gov/inforesources/calfresh/california-food-assistance-program.

Housing

Statewide Updates

Utilities

California  Palo Alto

The City of Palo Alto’s Community Support Call Center: call (650) 272-3181.

COVID-19 resources: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/coronavirus

Education

Utilities

Financial assistance may be available. For more information, call the Utilities Customer Service desk at (650) 329-2333 or visit the service page: https://www.cityofpaloalto.org/gov/depts/utl/business/billpay/default.aspsee also https://www.cityofpaloalto.org/gov/depts/utl/billpay/lowincome.asp

California San Francisco – Generally

Citywide resourceshttps://sf.gov/topics/coronavirus-covid-19.

Assistance for the Homeless

San Francisco has increased protections for the homeless: https://sfmayor.org/article/san-francisco-increases-covid-19-protections-homeless-residents-and-people-living-single.

San Francisco’s Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing map showing public bathroom and handwashing facilities: https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1jCE9lI8Iv12tO-wWrF6RIQPWKXGBK0_z&ll=37.77496798800447%2C-122.45194099008506&z=12.

Business Resources

Guide for determining whether your business is essential: https://sf.gov/check-if-your-business-essential.

Safety information for businesses: https://sf.gov/coronavirus-safety-essential-businesses.

Reimbursements for certain businesses paying their staff for extra sick leave: https://sf.gov/step-by-step/get-reimbursed-paying-your-sf-staff-extra-sick-time.

Employee support programs for those in need of income replacement: https://sf.gov/find-income-replacement-options-during-coronavirus.

Donations

List of nonprofit groups focused on assisting persons experiencing homelessness: https://projects.sfchronicle.com/sf-homeless/how-to-help/. 

Evictions

San Francisco’s moratorium on evictions: https://sf.gov/news/about-citys-temporary-moratorium-evictions.

Minimum Environmental Cleaning Standards for Businesses, Schools, and SRO Settings

The San Francisco Department of Public Health issued the following standards: https://www.sfdph.org/dph/alerts/files/COVID%E2%80%9019-Minimum-Environmental-Cleaning-Standards.pdf.

Residential Facilities

The San Francisco Department of Public Health is currently restricting visitors and non-essential personnel from visiting certain residential facilities: https://www.sfdph.org/dph/alerts/files/Order-C19-09-ExcludingVisitorstoARFs-RCFEs-03192020.pdf.

Utility Assistance

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission will continue to provide essential water, power, and wastewater services: https://sfwater.org/index.aspx?page=1321. The COVID-19 response guide is available at https://sfwater.org/index.aspx?page=1321.

PG&E suspended shutoffs for nonpayment: https://www.pge.com/en_US/about-pge/company-information/protective-protocols/covid19-protections.page. PG&E’s COVID-19 response page is available at https://www.pge.com/en_US/about-pge/company-information/protective-protocols/covid19.page.

California – San Francisco Bay Area Counties 

Assistance for the Homeless

Evictions

back to top

 

ABOUT BAKER BOTTS L.L.P.
Baker Botts is an international law firm of approximately 725 lawyers practicing throughout a network of 14 offices around the globe. Based on our experience and knowledge of our clients' industries, we are recognized as a leading firm in the energy and technology sectors. Since 1840, we have provided creative and effective legal solutions for our clients while demonstrating an unrelenting commitment to excellence. For more information, please visit bakerbotts.com.

Read More